Desert Gardening



Written by Jeff

Follow Jeff on Twitter for daily garden tips and news!

spacer

© Jeff Ross and www.gardeningonthemoon.com, 2000-2075. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts of 50 words or less and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jeff Ross and www.gardeningonthemoon.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

To keep our garden inspiration flowing, I will post pictures of flowers, trees and other plants that I have found pretty and/or interesting for one reason or another. Many of the pictures will be of drought-tolerant or xeriscape plants because I live and grow in the Sonoran Desert.

I hope these photographs stimulate your creativity and keep you enthusiastic about the wonderful world of horticulture. Please feel free to share your thoughts with me by leaving a comment below.


Happy Gardening!

The Maricopa County Master Gardener Tour, Real Gardens for Real People, was held at the end of March and there were many beautiful flowers, vegetables and assorted plants on display.

Some people think that only cactus and succulents can be grown in the Phoenix, AZ area, but we can grow almost everything that can be grown in the more moderate climates as long as care is taken. Below are pictures of Hollyhocks which feel right at home in the Sonoran Desert Gardens.

Hollyhock

Hollyhock

Hollyhock

Hollyhbock

Of course there are some plants which cannot be grown in the Sonoran Desert and the trick is to determine which plants will work in a specific area!

spacer

Find a Good Home for Your Website at



You may also click HERE to visit Bluehost’s Site for more Information about Finding a Good Home for Your Website/Blog!

Gardening on the Moon, www.gardeningonthemoon.com, originally published this post

Visit Amazon’s Garden & Patio Markdowns


Written by Jeff


Follow Jeff on Twitter for daily garden tips and news!

spacer

You may recall that we planted a Queen’s Wreath two years ago, nursed it through its first season and pampered it a bit during the second season. It really came into its own last year and was quite full by the end of the season.

Queen's Wreath

When we planted this specimen, we weren’t sure the rabbits wouldn’t get to it or that it would survive so we built a homemade structure to host the plant. You can see part of it here. The birds enjoy the lookout perch!

Queen's Wreath with Hummingbird

We just used simple building materials found at one of the big box stores and unfortunately, it was too skimpy to survive some of the big wind storms we have in the desert.

Queen's Wreath on Broken Support Structure

The structure was severely bent toward the east (your left as viewed) and attempts to straighten it with all of that weight failed.

So we finally decided to upgrade our caretaker protocols and we purchased a manufactured arbor.

A New Arbor for the Queen's Wreath

This was quite nice and amazingly snapped together in about 20-25 minutes with the simplest of tools. As usual, I anchored it with pieces of rebar and two of the anchor nails provided.

Queen's Wreath on the Arbor from the side

We took this action when the Queen’s Wreath was just sprouting to avoid damaging much of the growth. Notice the pink buds (denoted by the blue arrows).

Queen's Wreath Sprouting

Last year we realized that, if left on its own, the plant would latch on without any pattern and bunch up at will. This led to an uneven appearance. To avoid that this year, I am attempting to “train” the vine.

In the picture below, notice that the plant is off center because of the large agave on the left. (pink arrows indicate where the verticals for the arbor are in order to distinguish from the shadow. The yellow circle is the main part of the Queen’s Wreath.) We wanted to make sure that the vine on the right side latches on appropriately without curling back onto itself since it has a longer way to go.

Defining the Problem

The plan is to put narrow wooden stakes near the plant’s shoots then tie string to the stakes and the arbor. The plant’s tendrils should “reach” for the string and use it to climb toward the arbor.

String and Scissors

To tie the plant we use pieces of old nylons as they are soft and stretch as the plant grows. Tie the plant loosely to avoid damaging the vines and use a color that best blends in with the plant or its surroundings.

Various Colored Nylons for Tying

Here is what the project looks like when completed:

Queen's Wreath Tied and Satked

Notice how the plant’s vines on the left are very near catching on to the arbor by themselves.

Here is a closer view of the tied plant material when tied appropriately:

Close Up of Tied Queen's Wreath

In this picture you can see that there are three plant “arms” tied to stakes and string.

Three large arms tied

Here is a picture of the vines “latching on” taken a week after the pictures above. Notice how the tendrils (pinkish in color) have grabbed the arbor and in the upper part of the picture, the string.

Tendrils grabbed on one week later

We will watch the plant as it grows and manually move the vines so they spread as evenly as possible around the arbor and hopefully will put on quite a show!

spacer

Gardening on the Moon, www.gardeningonthemoon.com, originally published this post


Find a Good Home for Your Blog at
 


Written by Jeff


 

Follow Jeff on Twitter for daily garden tips and news!

spacer

spacer

It had been 70 days since we had any measurable rain in the Phoenix area, but that string has now been broken. Yesterday alone we had over two inches and considering that we receive on average between ten and twelve inches, that is quite a lot. We even had a bit of rain the day before.

Well…rain wasn’t all the weather news. We had a period of five minutes or so with sleet and heavy winds. We are thankful that no trees or large plants were downed, but we did have some interesting sights!

Here is our Mexican Honeysuckle taking in the rain and direct hit of sleet.

spacer

The pictures are a bit fuzzy because I took them through the window. The Moroccan Mound was trying to figure out what this white stuff was!
spacer

The Bower Vine was flaunting its recent haircut, but probably wanted some of it back just to add additional “warmth” and protection.

spacer

Out courtyard agave was thankful for a bit of protection from the wind…

spacer

while a street side cousin had to brave the elements au natural!

spacer

spacer

spacer

Gardening on the Moon, www.gardeningonthemoon.com, originally published this post

 

Visit Amazon’s Garden & Patio Markdowns


Find a Good Home for Your Blog at
 


Written by Jeff
Non-GOTM pictures credited by hover notes – move cursor over image

Follow Jeff on Twitter for daily garden tips and news!


© Jeff Ross and www.gardeningonthemoon.com, 2000-2075 and to the legal copyright limit. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts of 50 words or less and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jeff Ross and www.gardeningonthemoon.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.


  • Emu Bush

    spacer

    Small Steps Toward a Sustainable Landscape – Part 1 – Some ideas about gardening in an environmentally-friendly way and making reasonable uses of resources. I once read somewhere that it takes more than 60 gallons of water to “create” enough beef for each hamburger when one takes into account growing the grain, giving water to the cows, etc. I am not exactly sure how sustainable that is, but…we can do what we can in other areas.


http://www.azplantlady.com/2014/02/small-steps-toward-sustainable.html

If you want to see some gardens that need to move in a sustainable direction, check out this post – http://www.azplantlady.com/2014/02/what-keeps-landscape-from-being.html

spacer



  • Pachysandra

    Pachysandra or Spurge for shade You Can Grow That! – We had a large tree in our front yard and we couldn’t grow grass there and it wasn’t easy to mow the weeds so we decided to grow pachysandra. We bought 50 plants and once established, they took off and looked great. It did need grooming every year, but it gave the area a “finished” look!

http://allthedirtongardening.blogspot.com/2014/02/pachysandra-or-spurge-for-shade-you-can.html

link separator

spacer


  • Raised Garden Bed

    A neat raised garden bed [not pictured above] with a “hybrid” irrigation system. Looks relatively easy to do! As a matter of fact, this could be a good “starting point” for someone looking to enhance it. Perhaps some rebar and another layer of cinder block to make it higher

http://www.phoenixpermaculture.org/profiles/blogs/cinder-block-garden-with-hybrid-irrigation-system

link separator

spacer


  • Ornamental Garden Grass

    Garden Grasses Including New Varieties – Many people enjoy growing decorative grasses because some of them are easy to grow and provide a nice variation of texture and color. In the Phoenix, AZ area, we have a problem with some grasses that have become invasive. Once the ground is disturbed for building purposes, these grasses tend to take over, edging out native plant material. I would recommend checking with your local agent to see if there are any grasses in your area listed as invasive and then avoid those when selecting plant material.

http://allthedirtongardening.blogspot.com/2014/02/new-pennisetum-grasses-for-our-gardens.html

link separator


  • Rock Garden

    Rock Gardening: Creating a Miniature World of Plants – I always liked rock gardens because they could be neatly contained and used as a completely separate garden area. It is one way of dealing with a microclimate as well.


http://www.waterwisegardening.com/archives/3086

link separator

spacer

spacer

Find a Good Home for Your Website at

spacer

Gardening on the Moon, www.gardeningonthemoon.com, originally published this post

spacer

Visit Amazon’s Garden & Patio Markdowns

spacer


spacer

Written by Jeff
Non-GOTM pictures credited by hover notes – move cursor over image

Follow Jeff on Twitter for daily garden tips and news!


© Jeff Ross and www.gardeningonthemoon.com, 2000-2075 and to the legal copyright limit. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts of 50 words or less and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Jeff Ross and www.gardeningonthemoon.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.


  • Echinacea or Cone FLower

    spacer

    Echinacea – Perennial of the Year – (Read the caveats and recommendations for those with challenging climates; like mine!)


http://www.waterwisegardening.com/archives/2964

spacer



spacer


  • Indoor cactus in bloom

    How to get those indoor cacti to bloom?

http://www.hortmag.com/weekly-tips/qa/why-wont-my-potted-cacti-ever-flower

link separator

spacer


  • Norway Spruce

    This dwarf evergreen spruce, ‘Acrocona’ Norway Spruce, has a surprise in store for you! The picture does not show the surprise! Click the link to see it all.


http://serenityinthegarden.blogspot.com/2013/12/acrocona-norway-spruce-photo-of-day.html

link separator

spacer


  • ZZZ

    Trying to liven up those winter landscapes? Why not look at some of these plants that have “winter interest”?

http://www.provenwinners.com/learn/landscaping/shrubs-winter-interest

link separator


  • Seedlings

    It is NOT too early to start thinking about next year’s garden (2014 – yikes)!


http://www.growingthehomegarden.com/2013/12/when-to-sow-seeds-and-other-garden-tasks.html

link separator

spacer

spacer

Find a Good Home for Your Website at

spacer

Gardening on the Moon, www.gardeningonthemoon.com, originally published this post

spacer

Visit Amazon’s Garden & Patio Markdowns

spacer


spacer

Next Page »